Litchfield to Limmen

We thought while we were so close to Darwin we’d better have a look though we’re not big on cities. We spent a day looking at the museum which had a good display on Cyclone Tracy and the natural history was well done but unfortunately the aboriginal art was closed for renovations. We strolled through the Botanic Gardens and finished at Mindil Beach night market where we bought tea.

We headed down to Berry Springs and had a day at the Territory Wildlife Park which was much more ‘our thing’. We started with the bird display and then made our way around the various habitats with the aquarium, feeding of the whiprays and the bird aviaries being our favourites. Well worth a visit!

It was then into Litchfield National Park, the alternative to Kakadu but I found it quite different. It was more about waterfalls and swimming. Wangi Falls was very impressive and a great campsite as well as good swimming.¬† Tolmer Falls are very high but hard to capture. The Cascades were fairly ordinary and Florence Falls was smaller though the walk along Shady Creek to the falls was lovely. Buley Rockhole was a series of small falls and little rockholes – we arrived early and enjoyed it’s charm until the swimmers started arriving and filling up the holes. The Lost City can stay lost (fairly ordinary) but the ranger talk at the magnetic termite mounds was very informative.

We passed Robin Falls on the way to Douglas hot springs (not as good as Bitter Springs) and then headed off the tourist track to Limmen NP. The road reflected that being corrugated, full of bull dust holes and with unexpectedly deep creek crossings. The north part of the park was great for fishermen. We stopped off at Butterfly Springs but weren’t tempted to swim. Next stop was the Southern Lost City which was definitely worth a stop with a walk between the formations of towering sandstone spires. We also visited Caranbarini between Borroloola and Cape Crawford where the spires were much fatter and the path wound through narrow alleyways. Our journey through the Northern Territory ended across the Barkly Tablelands with vast areas of grassland.

 

 

Kakadu

I’ve heard all the talk about Kakadon’t and Kakadu versus Litchfield but we went anyway to see for ourselves. As long as you have the time to visit all the different highlights we found it was full of variety and amazing places but if you don’t have time to see it properly, by all means go to Litchfield which is beautiful too. Kakadu has more variety with natural scenery and cultural sites as well.

First we stopped off at Umbrawarra Gorge, a pretty little gorge off the beaten track. Then it was in to Kakadu to visit the escarpment at the bottom of the park. This provided the swimming holes and waterfalls lacking in the north. We stayed at Gunlom and were wary of the bottom pool until we saw others swimming there, but the best place to swim was at the top of the falls in the small pools with a sensational view. The host campground manager told us about Motorcar Falls so we ventured there while driving out. The falls were pretty but low in water but the swimming hole was one of the best I have seen. We sat on a big rock at the edge with the waterfall trickling opposite surrounded by this big, green pool.

A visit into Maguk gave us another waterfall and huge pool. We also found the track to the top of the falls where the stream makes its way through a narrow gorge. I wasn’t brave enough to swim through as others had but admired it from the rocks. I was a little nervous at our campsite as there were fires in every direction but this is standard for the dry season in the Northern Territory and they don’t pose a threat, just give glowing red sunsets.

Next stop was Nourlangie Rock with its galleries of rock art. It is certainly more extensive and vibrant than anything we see in southern Australia. More¬† crocodile warnings meant we couldn’t complete the circuit around the lagoon.

We elected to take the sunrise cruise at Yellowwater for the bird life but we got our share of crocodiles as well with one swimming by and later as they sunned themselves on a bank. One freshwater crocodile gave us a chance to compare their relative sizes. The jacanas were fascinating with their oversize feet allowing them to stride around on the lily pads and dad hid the chicks under his feathers when we got too close creating a comical bird with many legs.

At Ubirr Rock there was another impressive display of rock art and we sat on the rock with everyone else for the sunset. We then returned to our camp and cooked in the dusk swarmed by mosquitoes before retreating to the tent to eat.

From Alice to Katharine

We headed on north up the Stuart Highway aiming for the Devil’s Marbles which neither of us had seen before – only photos to whet our appetite. Every 2nd caravan on the highway mast have had the same idea as at 3.00pm we found we had to squeeze into a space between two others and late comers ended up at the day area. It was worth it all as we strolled among the vast array of boulders as the sun caused them to glow. Sunset wasn’t enough as I headed out again for starlight and sunrise.

We stopped at Daly Waters which is a classic outback pub but a crowded dusty caravan park and I wouldn’t bother again. On the advice of the lady at Standley Chasm we headed for Bitter Springs instead of Mataranka and she was right. We walked from the park to the springs where we could float down through the clear water with our mask and snorkel studying the underwater world and spotting fish and turtles. We had a look at Mataranka but the concreted pool wasn’t as nice and was much more crowded. Morning was even nicer without the crowds as mist rose from the water.

We stayed at the gorge at Nitmiluk (Katharine Gorge) and after walking to the lookout in the evening, we were up early for the sunrise cruise the next day. The flying foxes were returning from their nightly forage and made sure we didn’t sleep in. The sun gradually lit up the cliffs as we headed up the first gorge. We had to get off the boat and walk to the second gorge to continue our trip. We then returned back to the beginning.