Winter in Tassie

Just for a change we’ve taken only our 2nd trip to Tasmania in winter. It’s the season to chase waterfalls and we found there was almost too much water as 75mm fell the night before we arrived. In the north we visited our favourite Liffey Falls which was roaring. The Honeycomb Caves we have explored in the past could not be entered due to the water flowing through. We joined with Robin, a local who chases unknown waterfalls, to visit Montana Falls and to revisit the very impressive Sensation Gorge.

A trip to Meander Falls that we had previously seen trickling over in summer had us climbing up into the snow. The falls were flowing well but we didn’t linger in the cold. We had to wade the cold Mother Cummings rivulet to visit Chasm falls but it was as always worth it.

We headed south to base ourselves in Kingston and chase more waterfalls and peaks. Snug falls were flowing well and Pelverata falls were an unexpected delight as they dropped down an impressively stepped mountainside. A glorious day had us heading south to climb Hartz Peak. The clear night had all the pools covered with ice and the snow on the peak being hard and slippery. We took it carefully and were rewarded with grand 360 degree views.

As Jessica and Nick returned home we headed to more waterfalls on Mt Wellington. Myrtle Gully falls look much better with a decent fall of water and Secret Falls are very mysterious. Dark Mofo was on so we had dinner at the midwinter feast with a great variety of food stalls to choose from.

We were booked in to stay at Government Huts on Mt Field but made a stop at Russell Falls on the way. There was a very impressive display of fungi and as usual it was Horseshoe falls that captured all out attention.

We were lucky to have a blue sky day to climb up to Tarn Shelf as the others in the huts had had days of drizzle. It meant the snow was again treacherous (at least to we cautious oldies!) but we made it safely to Rodway Hut. It was then fairly easy to head to the tarns, the first one of which had a layer of ice on top. After lots of photos we headed back down.

We were lucky enough to have a visit from a quoll who enjoyed the milk that had been left out in the cold. The possums here are very dark and have a thick coating of winter fur. The setting of the huts by a valley with tarns and pencil pines had us making numerous trips outside to capture it in various lights including a frost on the last morning.

We headed up the east coast for our trip home stopping at Swansea to enjoy sunrise and sunset over the Hazards on Freycinet Peninsula.

Our final night was at St Helens with a visit to the Bay of Fires then a couple more waterfalls on the way to Devenport.

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The Sound of Falling Water

For a change of season we headed to Tasmania in Spring instead of our usual Summer trip. This gave us the opportunity to revisit favourite waterfalls with good flows and also find some new ones. The tiers along the northern coast produce many of them. We went back to Guide Falls, an easy walk, and Champagne and Bridal Veil Falls near Lemonthyme Lodge. Upper Cam Falls are a photographers delight and the Castra circuit gave us a number of falls.

A website, Waterfalls of Tasmania, was our gateway to many new falls as well as reminding us how to get to ones we’d seen before. Sensation Gorge had only a rough track but was well worth visiting. Another new one to us was Bastion Cascades in a very pretty setting. We revisited Smoko Creek with its many lovely falls and cascades though we were disappointed that the rickety log that enabled you to see Chasm Falls had been removed (it was very dangerous!). Hopefully a bridge will replace it in future. Dip Falls were amazing as the water cascaded over the basalt columns.

Every trip to Tasmania seems to see us at Liffey Falls, possibly my favourite of all.

We also headed down the west and back to Hobart. This took us past the delightful small but colourful Nelson Bay Falls in the Tarkine, the ever reliable Nelson Falls, Tarraleah Falls near the town and the popular Russell Falls and the photographers’ favourite – Horseshoe Falls.

Return to Bruny

Our now annual trip to Tasmania began with the trip on the Spirit of Tasmania – in a cabin this time as we feel we are past using the recliners for the overnight trip. We headed through the Central Highlands with our usual stop at Liffey Falls, our favourite waterfall in Tasmania. We also scrambled up the scree at Quamby Bluff for a hard climb but little reward due to cloud cover.

We timed our visit to Hobart with the bi-annual Wooden Boat Festival though it was entirely unintentional. The handiwork is amazing and the boats seem too beautiful to put in the water. The sail past was a great display of sail.

The weather was against our plans for walks in the mountains so we retreated to the much more pleasant climate of Bruny Island to complete some of the walks we had missed last time. We began at Cloudy Bay with a walk to East Cloudy Head where we found we could have easily driven along the beach to the very nice Cosy Corner camping are instead of making do with the more accessible Pines. The walk gave views back on Cloudy Bay but unfortunately not the impressive cliffs of the headland. We then moved to the lovely camp at Jetty Beach where a new water tank has been added. We visited the lighthouse where I took the tour to the top between showers and appreciated the magnificent views. We walked the Labillardiere Peninsula the next day, an easy walk showing the contrasting sides of the peninsula.

We headed for Adventure Bay where we revisited the best views of Fluted Cape.  I took the Bruny Island cruise while Ray went to set up camp at the Neck. The views of the cliffs from sea level were even more dramatic and many more features were revealed. We spotted caves, zoomed between rock monuments and were wet by spray from an undersea spout. At the Friars we watched the fur seals basking in the sun and frolicking in the water while a pod of dolphins joined us for part of the trip back.

The Neck campground gives views from both sides of the isthmus and turned on a spectacular sunrise. We returned to Hobart via pretty Snug Falls.

Tasmania – Heading north


After leaving Bruny Island we headed north via the Great Lake. We couldn’t drive past Liffey Falls without visiting as I think it’s my favourite waterfall on the island. You get three very different waterfalls on the walk and every time we visit the water is at a different level creating varied views.

We then headed off on what turned out to be a most excellent walk and a highlight of our trip. We had track notes for a four day walk but decided to turn it into an easier out and back to Cathedral Mountain. It was a lovely walk in through varied forests and we were surprised to reach Chapter Lake after two hours as our notes said it would take three. This gave us lots of time to explore Grail Falls.

We left the packs behind for our day walk to Cathedral Mountain. This involved climbing up above the falls and following the stream to the much larger Chalice Lake. As we passed by this lake the view was constantly changing with the many inlets and islands. We had to keep out eye open for the cairns that marked the route and had to backtrack a couple of times. We climbed up past Tent Tarn and onto the ridge which gave a glorious panorama of all the peaks on the Overland track from Cradle Mountain to Mt Olympus. As this had taken us four hours we decided to give the peak a miss and sat and soaked up the beautiful view.

The walk out took us back through the eucalypt, beech and acacia forests. We stopped off to visit the pretty Gadd Ck Falls on the return drive.

Another day, another waterfall. This time Westmorland Falls. The drive took us past the Mole Creek Karst NP and we decided to pop in for a look. We found a huge network of large open tunnels with lots of exits including one at the bottom of a sinkhole. It was very impressive and we were pleased we had stopped as it was a good way to conclude our Tasmanian adventure.